Merging Matters

Merging Matters

If you're based in the Channel Islands you may have seen in the media this week that Crill Canavan in Jersey and Collas Day in Guernsey have merged to form Collas Crill, a legal firm with some considerable legal muscle across both jurisdictions.

The Potting Shed have been working closely with their marketing department to merge these two vibrant brands into one while paying homage to the origins of both. Over the coming weeks we will show you how this brand continues to roll out through print, advertising and electronic mediums but for now we'd simply like to show you the new brand and it's origins.

Both firms had strong, contemporary brands and the more we looked into the merits of both the more we realised how much they already had in common. Obviously the letter C was common to both so the cursive forms in the letter driven icons for each would carry into the new brand and the pink was present in both brands so that too was brought across as the central theme to the new brand.

When you are taking the bold step to use pink in your logo you must have the courage of your convictions and stand firmly behind it rather than relegate it to be a mere addendum to your brand. The new Collas Crill Icon shows the strength and unity of the company as well as hinting at the transparent nature of their processes.

As we drilled down further into the type choices from the original brands we also discovered several similarities there. When we drew the original logotype for Collas Day we based the letterforms on the ubiquitous font Gill Sans, which we then redrew and amended to fit the clients purposes at the time.

When Crill Canavan's agency created their logotype they used a font called Museo a font who's sans serif version Museo Sans was drawn by also from the basis of Gill Sans. A lucky coincidence but one that seemed to good not to seize upon. Therefore the new Collas Crill logotype was drawn with Museo Sans as the base.

Obviously there are several unique touches to the new typeset but the bones of all three of these brands stem from the same place: Eric Gill and his eponymous 1920s typeface.

Upper Case was used to show a very literal sense of progression and growth and the companies merge together.

here's been a million documents set and loads more in the pipeline but for now we'd just like to say congratulations to Collas Crill and we look forward to a bright pink future.